Nissan Gazelle

Zaheer July 29, 2011 0


Nissan Gazelle was a 2-door compact coupe and 3-door hatchback manufactured and sold by Nissan from 1979 to 1989. The vehicle was built on Nissan S platform. It was offered for sale only in Japan and Australia. The vehicle was closely related to the Nissan Silvia. It was sold by the Nissan dealership in Japan that sold Nissan Silvia as well. Silvia and Gazelle were produced with slight differences in their aesthetic zeal. The S110 and S12 Silvia models had their equivalent models in Gazelle lineup.

The S12 Silvia was offered as a hatchback and available only in basic version, while the S12 Gazelle was offered as a hatchback in Japan and available in regular, RS and RS-X versions like that of Silvia notchback. Japanese models were offered with a number of different features including voice command, fog lights and different motor options such as FJ20DE, CA18DE, CA18E, CA18DET. The RS-X featured alloy wheels different from other variants.

The Australian versions of S12 chassis were offered in both body styles under Nissan Gazelle name. It was available in GL (standard) and SGL (luxury) versions featuring electric motors and windows.

The Australian versions of the S12 Gazelle powered by SOHC CA20E motor, developing 78 kW at 5200 rpm and torque of 160 Nm at 3200 rpm. The engine was combined with a 5-speed manual gearbox or a 4-speed automatic. For the motoring enthusiasts, this CA20E engine was very underpowered for any sports coupe and engine conversion was one of the popular practices among them. The CA18DE/T being a direct bolt was an obvious replacement engine for the CA20E because it didn’t require any alteration to the drive train except for engine itself.

In 1988, the S13 Silvia appeared on the scene as a result of which the Gazelle badge was dropped by Nissan. In the Japanese market, the Nissan 180SX replaced Gazelle, while the Australian market didn’t receive any replacement vehicle until the launch of the Nissan 200SX built on Silvia platform in 1995.

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