Mitsubishi Magna

Zaheer June 30, 2011 0


Mitsubishi Magna was a large mid-sized car manufactured and introduced by Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited in May 1985. The car was assembled and developed at the Tonsley Park plant and stretched over three generations. The Magna remained in production until September 2005 when it was replaced by Mitsubishi 380. The engines used in Magna, i.e. 4-cylinder (4G54/Astron II) and V6 (6G72 and 6G74) were built at the Lonsdale plant situated in South Australia.

Before the launch of Magna, Mitsubishi already had a large family car to compete with the Ford Falcon and Holden Commodore in the shape of 6-cylinder Chrysler Valiant. It was received as a legacy to Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited when it acquired Chrysler Australia in 1980. In 1981, the production of the Valiant was ceased as a result of which Sigma became the major production vehicle of Mitsubishi Australia.

When it came to design a replacement vehicle for Sigma, Mitsubishi Australia looked deep into the fact that the width of the car was of major concern to Australian drivers who traditionally have admired the larger vehicles. Keeping this fact in mind, the Mitsubishi Australia together with the Chrysler engineers built a wider mid-sized car particularly for the Australian market in order to compete with large-sized Ford Falcon and Holden Commodore. This was achieved by joining an extra 2.6-inch right down the middle of Japanese mid-sized Mitsubishi Galant.

With the passage time, the size of the Magna was enlarged and it was offered with more powerful V6 engine and 4-wheel drive platforms. Magna was regarded as the first Australian made Mitsubishi vehicle that took over the previous front wheel drive Mitsubishi 380 sedan. These two were the only Australian made Mitsubishi vehicles as Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited halted the operations of its South Australian facility in 2008.

First Generation (1985-1991)

The first generation model of Magna appeared in 1985. Initially, it was offered as sedan only, but later in 1987, station wagon version was also added in the lineup. The first generation model was also called Mitsubishi V3000.

The different series produced during first generation include:

TM (1985–1987; sedan-only)

  • GLX - carbureted; manual and automatic
  • Executive - carbureted; manual and automatic
  • SE - carbureted; manual and automatic
  • Elite - carbureted; automatic

TN (1987–1989)

  • GLX - carbureted and electronic fuel injection (EFI); manual and automatic
  • Executive - carbureted and EFI; automatic
  • SE - carbureted and EFI; manual and automatic
  • Challenge wagon – carbureted and EFI; manual and automatic
  • Elite - EFI; automatic
  • Elante sedan - EFI; manual and automatic

TP (1989–1991)

  • GLX - carbureted and EFI; manual and automatic
  • Executive - carbureted and EFI; manual and automatic
  • SE - EFI; manual and automatic
  • Elite - EFI; automatic
  • Elante sedan - EFI; manual and automatic
  • Grand Tourer - (EFI; manual and automatic
  • Executive Safari wagon - EFI; manual and automatic

Second Generation (1991-1996)

The second generation model of Magna was a complete redesign and offered as a larger sedan and station wagon versions shared their platforms with Mitsubishi Diamante and Sigma hardtop.

TR (1991–1994)

  • GLX - carbureted; manual and automatic
  • Executive - EFI; manual and automatic
  • Executive V6 - manual and automatic
  • SE - EFI; manual and automatic
  • Elite - EFI; automatic

TS (1994–1996)

  • GLX - carbureted; manual and automatic
  • Executive - EFI; manual and automatic
  • Executive V6 - manual and automatic
  • SE - EFI; manual and automatic
  • SE V6 - automatic
  • V6-SI sedan – manual and automatic
  • Advance V6 – manual and automatic

Third Generation (1996–2005)

The third generation Magna was launched by Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited (MMAL) in 1996. The different series produced during third generation include:

TE (1996–1997)

  • Executive - 4-cylinder and 3.0-Litre V6
  • Advance - 3.0-Litre V6
  • Altera – 4-cylinder and 3.0-Litre V6
  • Altera LS – 3.0-Litre V6; automatic

TF (1997–1998)

  • Executive - 4-cylinder and 3.0-Litre V6
  • Advance - 3.0-Litre V6
  • Altera - 3.0-Litre V6
  • Altera LS - 3.0-Litre V6; automatic
  • Sports sedan - 3.0-Litre V6

TH (1999–2000 – the first approx. 30 units built in December 1998)

  • Executive – 3.0-Litre or 3.5-Litre V6
  • Executive LS (May–June 2000) - 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • Advance - 3.5-Litre V6
  • Altera LS (1999) - 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • Sports sedan – 3.5-Litre V6

TJ series I/II (2000–2003)

  • Executive - 3.5-Litre V6 and 3.0-Litre up to 30 July 2002
  • Advance – 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • AWD sedan (2002) - down-powered 3.5-Litre V6; automatic)
  • Sports sedan - uprated 163 kW 3.5-Litre V6
  • Sports wagon (late 2001) - uprated 163 kW 3.5-Litre V6
  • Sports AWD sedan – down-powered 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • VR-X sedan - based on Sports but with bodykit; uprated 163 kW 3.5-Litre V6
  • Ralliart sedan (2002) -  based on VR-X but with revised bodykit; uprated 180 kW 3.5-Litre V6; about 500 individually numbered cars built

TL (2003–2004)

  • ES - 3.5-Litre V6; replaced Executive
  • LS - 3.5-Litre V6; automatic; replaced Advance
  • AWD sedan - down-powered 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • VR sedan - uprated 163 kW 3.5-Litre V6; replaced Sports
  • VR AWD sedan - down-powered 3.5-Litre V6; automatic
  • VR-X sedan - uprated 163 kW 3.5-Litre V6

TW (2004–2005)

  • ES - 3.5-Litre V6
  • LS sedan - AWD; automatic
  • VR wagon - wagon; automatic
  • VR-X sedan
  • VR-X AWD sedan – automatic

There were certain limited and luxury series as well throughout the third generation not mentioned here. Also, wagons and all-wheel drive systems didn’t entertain with manual transmission.

Leave A Response »